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U.S. order on rules skips key regulations

Reuters WASHINGTON (Reuters) — President Donald Trump signed an order on Monday that will seek to dramatically reduce federal regulations, but the policy will not apply to most of the financial reform rules introduced by the Obama administration.

Trump’s latest executive action will require that agencies cut two existing regulations for every new rule introduced and it will set an annual cap on the cost of new regulations.

For the rest of fiscal 2017, the cap will require that the cost of any additional regulations be completely offset by undoing existing rules.

But, the move does not cover independent agencies that crafted many of the rules required by the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law, including the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the White House said.

It also would not apply to rules mandated by statutes.

“There will be regulation, there will be control, but it will be normalized control,” Trump said as he signed the order in the Oval Office, surrounded by a group of small business owners.

During a meeting with the business owners, Trump described the Dodd-Frank law as “a disaster.” He asserted that it was “almost impossible now to start a small business and it’s virtually impossible to expand your existing business because of regulations.”

The creation of new U.S. businesses has actually climbed steadily since 2010, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer on Monday called the executive order a “first step” and said the administration would work with Congress to begin making changes to Dodd-Frank.

Implementing the new regulatory order may be difficult alongside the Trump administration’s push to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, said Tom Bulleit, head of the health care practice in the Washington, D.C., office of law firm Ropes & Gray.

As the Congress passes new legislation on healthcare, there will need to be new rules, Bulleit said.

“There’s a great deal of regulation that is either expressly required by legislation or is necessary to make the legislation work,” he said.Speech

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